ET manufacturing awards set the benchmark for global play

There was once a time when a handful of family businesses comprised the length and breadth of Indian manufacturing — the Tatas, the Birlas, the Dalmias and the like. Decades later, the canvas has become much larger. At The Economic Times India Manufacturing Excellence Awards in partnership with Frost & Sullivan on January 27, no fewer than 25 companies took away the honours. Many were known names; others, emerging superstars of tomorrow.The five-year old award seeks to recognise those companies and facilities that have taken revolutionary strides towards adapting, modernising and optimising their systems and processes. And on this particular evening, it was apparent that there was plenty to celebrate. Amid pumping handshakes and sporadic outbursts of laughter, senior executives mingled. As the venue, Mumbai’s Intercontinental The Lalit, filled up, the canapes and wine disappeared off the trays. Raghavendra Rao of Frost & Sullivan kicked off proceedings by explaining the methodology of the awards, after which Dr Pawan Goenka of Mahindra took the stage.

Dr Goenka’s views on the state of Indian manufacturing tended to be cautious. Explaining that a lot of spadework was left, he said the National Manufacturing Competitiveness Council (NMCC) was aiming at 12% growth in the sector and this could only be achieved if the industry pulled its weight and took steps to contribute substantially more towards the national GDP. Immediately after, it was time for the evening’s highlight. The winners were divided into four categories: silver, gold, platinum and super-platinum. There were also two special awards to honour “companies to look out for in the near future”. Companies that had won ‘silver’ scored between 766 and 820 out of a total of 1,200 points awarded by the assessment teams that visited their facilities. ‘Gold’ winners scored between 821 and 875 while platinum awardees got 876 or more.

The first awards were in the Gold category. The eleven winners in this category included Weir Minerals, Minda Industries and Classic Auto Tubes as well as behemoths like Mahindra & Mahindra, Maruti Suzuki and Hindustan Unilever. The platinum winners included Tata Chemicals, Piramal Healthcare and Jubilant Organosys. But this year, the top three crowns were worn by Wabco-TVS India, Bajaj Auto and Tetra Pak India.

The process won kudos from those who attended. Chris Rao, vice-president, India operations, Goodrich Aerospace Services, said: “We liked the detailing that went into the audit. Everything from CSR to supply chain to processes was examined and as the only MNC aerospace manufacturing company in India, it gave us a clear picture of where we stood vis-à-vis our global peers.” Goodrich’s Bangalore unit won a special award.

Agreed C Sivaramane, director-production operations, NCR’s Puducherry unit: “It wasn’t a Power Point presentation; the assessors met people on the factory floor and the feedback was both transparent and credible.” The big winners confessed themselves amazed by India’s speedy ascent in manufacturing. Peter Hane-Weijman, managing director-South Asia Markets, Tetra Pak, said, “I was part of the team that started operations in India 12 years ago. Looking at ourselves today, we can see the difference in efficiency — less waste and more speed. And this award encourages us to constantly seek improvement in whatever we do.” Wabco’s Leon Liu, who accepted the Super Platinum award for its Chennai facility, along with Wabco-TVS India’s director P Kaniappan, has observed India’s recent growth as a manufacturing force. “The focus on lean manufacturing in India is a great thing to see,” he remarked. His belief is echoed by many others in Indian industry, who feel that this rapidly growing sector has only just begun to manufacture the phenomenal script of its own success. The ET manufacturing awards in partnership with Frost & Sullivan is supported by Underwriters Laboratories & McNally Bharat Engineering.

 
There was once a time when a handful of family businesses comprised the length and breadth of Indian manufacturing — the Tatas, the Birlas, the Dalmias and the like. Decades later, the canvas has become much larger. At The Economic Times India Manufacturing Excellence Awards in partnership with Frost & Sullivan on January 27, no fewer than 25 companies took away the honours. Many were known names; others, emerging superstars of tomorrow.The five-year old award seeks to recognise those companies and facilities that have taken revolutionary strides towards adapting, modernising and optimising their systems and processes. And on this particular evening, it was apparent that there was plenty to celebrate. Amid pumping handshakes and sporadic outbursts of laughter, senior executives mingled. As the venue, Mumbai’s Intercontinental The Lalit, filled up, the canapes and wine disappeared off the trays. Raghavendra Rao of Frost & Sullivan kicked off proceedings by explaining the methodology of the awards, after which Dr Pawan Goenka of Mahindra took the stage.

Dr Goenka’s views on the state of Indian manufacturing tended to be cautious. Explaining that a lot of spadework was left, he said the National Manufacturing Competitiveness Council (NMCC) was aiming at 12% growth in the sector and this could only be achieved if the industry pulled its weight and took steps to contribute substantially more towards the national GDP. Immediately after, it was time for the evening’s highlight. The winners were divided into four categories: silver, gold, platinum and super-platinum. There were also two special awards to honour “companies to look out for in the near future”. Companies that had won ‘silver’ scored between 766 and 820 out of a total of 1,200 points awarded by the assessment teams that visited their facilities. ‘Gold’ winners scored between 821 and 875 while platinum awardees got 876 or more.

The first awards were in the Gold category. The eleven winners in this category included Weir Minerals, Minda Industries and Classic Auto Tubes as well as behemoths like Mahindra & Mahindra, Maruti Suzuki and Hindustan Unilever. The platinum winners included Tata Chemicals, Piramal Healthcare and Jubilant Organosys. But this year, the top three crowns were worn by Wabco-TVS India, Bajaj Auto and Tetra Pak India.

The process won kudos from those who attended. Chris Rao, vice-president, India operations, Goodrich Aerospace Services, said: “We liked the detailing that went into the audit. Everything from CSR to supply chain to processes was examined and as the only MNC aerospace manufacturing company in India, it gave us a clear picture of where we stood vis-à-vis our global peers.” Goodrich’s Bangalore unit won a special award.

Agreed C Sivaramane, director-production operations, NCR’s Puducherry unit: “It wasn’t a Power Point presentation; the assessors met people on the factory floor and the feedback was both transparent and credible.” The big winners confessed themselves amazed by India’s speedy ascent in manufacturing. Peter Hane-Weijman, managing director-South Asia Markets, Tetra Pak, said, “I was part of the team that started operations in India 12 years ago. Looking at ourselves today, we can see the difference in efficiency — less waste and more speed. And this award encourages us to constantly seek improvement in whatever we do.” Wabco’s Leon Liu, who accepted the Super Platinum award for its Chennai facility, along with Wabco-TVS India’s director P Kaniappan, has observed India’s recent growth as a manufacturing force. “The focus on lean manufacturing in India is a great thing to see,” he remarked. His belief is echoed by many others in Indian industry, who feel that this rapidly growing sector has only just begun to manufacture the phenomenal script of its own success. The ET manufacturing awards in partnership with Frost & Sullivan is supported by Underwriters Laboratories & McNally Bharat Engineering.

Source : The Economic Times. 01/02/10

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: